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Vaccine Strategies for Livestock and Poultry | Esco VacciXcell

Vaccine Strategies for Livestock and Poultry

Autologous and Autogenous Vaccines

Apart from licensed vaccines, autogenous and autologous vaccines provide additional protection in controlling infectious diseases and maintaining livestock health. These vaccines are also most useful when there are no available licensed vaccines for the target pathogen or species.

Autologous vaccines are veterinary biologics prepared using pathogens and/or antigens isolated from an infected animal and used only for the particular animal.

Autogenous vaccines are veterinary biologics prepared using pathogens and/or antigens isolated from infected animals in a particular farm. These are then administered for the prevention of the disease for the same farm animals or nearby farms.

Countries where production IS ALLOWED* Countries where production IS NOT ALLOWED
Bacterial inactivated autogenous vaccines ASEAN
Australia
Canada
All EU member states
South Africa
United States
Viral inactivated autogenous vaccines ASEAN
Australia
Belgium
Canada
Czech Republic
Germany
Hungary
Italy
Poland
South Africa
UK
United States
Croatia
Denmark
Finland
France
Iceland
Norway
Portugal
Slovakia
Spain
Sweden
Live-attenuated vaccines** ASEAN
Australia
South Africa
Canada
All EU member states
USA

Autogenous vaccines are approved to meet specific and immediate need when a disease is associated with a new pathogenic organism, when approved veterinary biologics are not effective in controlling current disease problem, or when approved veterinary biologics are not available to prevent or control the disease situation.

Autogenous Vaccine Workflow

Mucosal vaccines

The goal of mucosal vaccines is to prevent infection of the pathogen through the mucosal surfaces instead of preventing the onset of the disease. Most pathogens enter through mucosal surfaces which should be protected by mucosal immunity.

Mucosal surfaces include nasal, sublingual, oral, rectal, vaginal, pulmonary, and trans-dermal. Choosing the right mucosa to administer the vaccine is critical for eliciting the effective immunity. Several theories have shown that mucosal sites are linked; suggesting the administration of vaccine at one mucosal site induces also protection at other mucosal sites.

Intranasal vaccines

Nasal vaccination in mice have been shown to elicit immune response at different mucosal sites. This is further achieved through the use of adjuvants such toxins (cholera or heat-labile enterotoxin).

Oral vaccines

The main challenge in oral antigens is the delivery and prevention of oral tolerance. There is a delicate balance for virulence such that it should not be too virulent that it causes the disease nor too attenuated that the immune system cannot mount a response.